A Good Laugh, Just for Students

Abbrev. Please!

Have you ever noticed how many acronyms exist in the world of speech-language pathology?  I never really thought about it until today, while sitting in my motor speech disorders class.  In a mere 3 powerpoint slides, we threw around at least 8 acronyms.  Insanity.  In all honesty, I love abbrevs and acros, assuming I am mildly successful in remember what they mean (that’s abbreviations and acronyms for anyone who hasn’t quite caught on…).  Now that I had begun thinking about the somewhat unbelievable rate of acro-usage going on in my department, I decided to keep track of all the ones I heard and/or used during a single day at UW (The University of Washington).  Rather than just list them all-which I’ve done at the bottom anyway-I decided to create sentences with them.  How many do you know without cheating and looking at the list at the end of the post?

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ID is the new MR in the APA literature.

After learning about his Dx, the stressed grad student checked Jimmy’s file for Hx of Sx as well as previous Ax and Tx done in the schools.  She also made sure to take note of his current Rx list.

If you’re diagnosed with PD, you might consider LSVT or DBS, since both options have EBP to support them.

ABR is a step in the process of identifying kids who may be candidates for a CI down the road.

SLI can be misdiagnosed in CLD kids who may exhibit a “difference” rather than a “disorder.”

The interdisciplinary clinic staffed a SLP, an OT, a PT, and an ABA specialist to help address the needs of their clients with ASD, who often require specialized Rf schedules and items.

After his TBI, he began seeing a SLT regularly to help him adjust to using an AAC device.

UL UMN damage typically doesn’t cause many speech impairments, since most CN’s receive bilateral UMN input.

MS and ALS are disorders that affect both BL LMNs and BL UMNs (thereby impairing the DAP and IAP).

She wrote her SOAP notes after a session with her client who has CP.

So…how many do you know off the top of your head?  It’s amazing to think that we talk in code during so much of the day!  I guess speeding up our talking leaves all the more time for paperwork 😉  Below is the list in case you want it for a reference!

PD: Parkinson’s Disease

DBS: deep brain stimulation

LSVT: Lee Silverman Voice Treatment

APA: American Psychological Association

Ax: Assessment

Tx: Treatment

Dx: Diagnosis

HX: History

Sx: Symptoms

Rx: Prescription

MR: Mental retardation (OLD term)

ID: Intellectual disability (NEW term)

CI: Cochlear implant

EBP: Evidence-based practice

CLD: Culturally and linguistically different

SLI: Specific language impairment

SLP: Speech-language pathologist

SLT: Speech-language therapist

OT: Occupational therapist

PT: Physical therapist

ABR: Auditory brainstem response

ABA: Applied behavior analysis

ASD: Autism spectrum disorder

TBI: Traumatic brain injury

UL: Unilateral

BL: Bilateral

UMN: Upper motor neuron

LMN: Lower motor neuron

CN: Cranial nerve

DAP: Direct Activation Pathway

IAP: Indirect Activation Pathway

MS: Multiple Sclerosis

ALS: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

CP: Cerebral palsy

SOAP: Subjective, Objective, Assessment, Plan

AAC: Augmentative and alternative communication

Rf: Reinforcement

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5 thoughts on “Abbrev. Please!”

  1. Nice post. I have to say I’m on the side of disliking the amount of acronyms in speech and language pathology/therapy. There seems to be something perverse about a profession that is about making communication a bit easier using so many.

    It’s probably just a case that you get so familiar with those in the areas you work with that you don’t even notice that they are acronyms but I regulalry come across new ones, especially when reading research papers which seem to introduce them for fun. Do you know your differences between your SFA Txs, SFG Txs and SFR Txs?

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    1. Needless to say, I just had to google the heck out of SFG so I actually could say that I DO know what it is. SFA (semantic feature analysis) was easy enough, but SFG (systematic functional grammar) was a new one for me! And SFR…what’s that?

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      1. And there is part of the problem – SFR and SFG, as I was intending to use them, are supposedly variants of SFA (Semantic Feature Review, and, Semantic Feature Generation). The difference lies in how much independence the patient/client has in self-generating semantic features, i.e. whether they really have to think of them for themselves, or whether you present features for them to make yes/no decisions on etc.

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  2. Wow I’m impressed! What about IDEA, IEP, DIR (floortime), DS, ASHA (;-) ), NESB, PA, DAS, …. and all those wonderful language/psych AX tools: CASL, TOPL, CELF, CTOPP, PPVT, WISC, BNT, GFTA….It’s endless! 🙂

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